WILMOT, Benjamin & Anne

Cliff McCarthy, 2016

Benjamin Wilmot was born about 1590 in England. Benjamin married Anne (some sources give her surname as “Ladd”). She was born in England in 1592. Their three children were all born in England.

Benjamin first appears in the records of New Haven on 4 June 1646. On 2 May 1648, “Old Goodman Willmote and Samuel Marsh tooke the oathe of fidellitie.” Jacobus states that his son Benjamin was in New Haven by 1641. The circumstances of their passage to America are unknown.

Benjamin Wilmot was a farmer and husbandman. The records usually call him “old Benjamin Wilmot” to distinguish him from his son. In her History of Hamden, Connecticut, Rachel M. Hartley stated that Benjamin Wilmot received one of “the earliest allotments on the west side of town,” an area known as the Hamden Plains. She wrote further:

“At the foot of West Rock in 1647 was a tract of 24 acres which had belonged to Thomas Fugill and which contained beds of clay suitable for brick-making; and in that year Benjamin Wilmot made application for the land, promising to build a house near-by on the lot which he already owned. This may have been the house where William Wilmot, son of Benjamin, was living with his mother four years later when he asked to be excused from standing the town watch.”

On May 1, 1654, “Old Goodman Willmot [Benjamin] desired the Court, that his son may be freed from [military] training, which was considered, and with reference to his own age, his wife’s weakness, and their living at a Farm, his Son was freed, only to attend as other Farmers do.” The son referred to was William.

Also, that year, when a new ox pasture was established beside Pine Rock, it required 400 rods of fencing. Benjamin Wilmot offered to build 60 rods of it, because he had four cows and two oxen to pasture there.

New Haven Vital Records state: “Anne, wife of old Benjamin Wilmot, dyed October 7, 1668” and “Old Benjamin Wilmot dyed Aug. 18, 1669.” Anne was 76 years old at her death. Benjamin’s will states that he was “aged about four score.” His will names three children, two of whom (Benjamin and Ann) were undoubtedly deceased when the will was written. So he named three children of his oldest son and four children of his daughter to take their portions in the division of the estate.

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Children of Benjamin & Anne WILMOT

BENJAMIN WILMOT was born Abt. 1590, and died 18 August 1669 in New Haven, CT.  He married ANNE.  She died 7 October 1668 in New Haven, CT. The Children of BENJAMIN WILMOT and ANNE are:

i.   BENJAMIN WILMOT, d. 8 April 1651, New Haven, CT; m. ELIZABETH TENNEY, Abt. 1642; b. Abt. 1610, England; d. 1685, New Haven, New Haven Co., CT.
ii.  ANN WILMOT, d. 1654; m. WILLIAM BUNNELL, Abt. 1640, New Haven, CT.
iii.  WILLIAM WILMOT, d. 1689; m. SARAH THOMAS, 14 October 1658, New Haven, CT; b. Abt. 1640; d. 28 December 1711, New Haven, CT.

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SOURCES:

  • Anderson, Mary Audentia Smith, Ancestry and Posterity of Joseph Smith and Emma Hale, (Independence, MO: 1929).
  • Cutter, William Richard et al., Genealogical and Family History of the State of Connecticut, Vols 1-4, (Lewis Historical Publishing Co., New York; 1911).
  • Dexter, Franklin Bowditch, Historical Catalogue of the Members of the First Church of Christ in New Haven, CT, (New Haven, CT, 1914).
  • Hartley, Rachel M., History of Hamden, Connecticut, 1786-1936, (Hamden, CT; 1943).
  • Jacobus, Donald Lines, Families of Ancient New Haven, (Genealogical Publishing Co.; Baltimore, MD, 1981).
  • Jacobus, Donald Lines, “The Wilmot Family of New Haven, Conn.”, (in Wilmot, Wilmoth, Wilmeth, Washburn Printing Co., Charlotte, NC, 1940).
  • Richardson, Douglas, “Tenney Family of Lincolnshire and Rowley, Massachusetts,” New England Historic Genealogical Society Register, July 1997.
  • Roberts, Gary Boyd, Genealogies of Connecticut Familes, (Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, MD, 1983).
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